sampling: http://www.cnblogs.com/xbinworld/p/4266146.html

viterbi: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viterbi_algorithm virerbi parse: http://www1.icsi.berkeley.edu/~stolcke/papers/cl95/node30.html

SJTU BASIC Summer School: http://basics.sjtu.edu.cn/summer_school/basics16/download/

Synthetic gradient: http://deliprao.com/archives/187

NLP Segmentation tutorial: http://chuansong.me/n/533306951860

ACL 2016 Tutorial Understanding Short Text: http://www.wangzhongyuan.com/tutorial/ACL2016/Understanding-Short-Texts/

AMR Specification: https://github.com/amrisi/amr-guidelines/blob/master/amr.md

ICML 2016 Tutorials: http://icml.cc/2016/?page_id=97

Memory Network Tutorial: http://www.thespermwhale.com/jaseweston/icml2016/

Advanced Topics of Mathematics: http://www.cims.nyu.edu/~bandeira/Fall2016.MATH.GA.2830.002.MathDataScience.html

The Role of Word Length in Semantic Topology https://arxiv.org/abs/1611.04842

On the Convergent Properties of Word Embedding Methods https://arxiv.org/abs/1605.03956

Multi-lingual Knowledge Graph Embeddings for Cross-lingual Knowledge Alignment https://arxiv.org/abs/1611.03954

Quasi-Recurrent Neural Networks https://arxiv.org/abs/1611.01576

What Do Recurrent Neural Network Grammars Learn About Syntax? https://arxiv.org/abs/1611.05774

Dynamic Coattention Networks For Question Answering https://arxiv.org/abs/1611.01604

Intelligible Language Modeling with Input Switched Affine Networks https://arxiv.org/abs/1611.09434

Online Sequence-to-Sequence Reinforcement Learning for Open-Domain Conversational Agents https://arxiv.org/abs/1612.03929

Path-based vs. Distributional Information in Recognizing Lexical Semantic Relations https://arxiv.org/abs/1608.05014

lambda calculus http://worrydream.com/AlligatorEggs/ http://blog.klipse.tech/lambda/2016/07/24/lambda-calculus-1.html http://palmstroem.blogspot.com/2012/05/lambda-calculus-for-absolute-dummies.html http://www.inf.fu-berlin.de/lehre/WS03/alpi/lambda.pdf

mxnet:

http://mxnet.io/api/python/symbol.html#executing-symbols http://mxnet.io/api/python/symbol.html#testing-utility-reference http://mxnet.io/tutorials/nlp/cnn.html https://github.com/dmlc/mxnet-notebooks/blob/master/python/tutorials/bucket_io.py https://github.com/dmlc/mxnet/blob/master/example/rnn/lstm.py https://github.com/dmlc/mxnet-notebooks/blob/master/python/tutorials/char_lstm.ipynb https://ljalphabeta.gitbooks.io/mxnet-notes/content/mxnet_python_overview_tutorial.html http://mxnet.io/tutorials/index.html#id1 http://mxnet-tqchen.readthedocs.io/en/latest/packages/python/tutorial.html http://mxnet-tqchen.readthedocs.io/en/latest/packages/python/symbol_in_pictures.html https://indico.io/blog/getting-started-with-mxnet/

wikipedia dump:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Database_download#Where_are_the_uploaded_files_.28image.2C_audio.2C_video.2C_etc..2C_files.29.3F https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Data_dumps https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Database_download#Static_HTML_tree_dumps_for_mirroring_or_CD_distribution https://www.mediawiki.org/wiki/Alternative_parsers https://www.mediawiki.org/wiki/Manual:Importing_XML_dumps https://www.mediawiki.org/wiki/Manual:MWDumper

Explaining the Learning Dynamics of Direct Feedback Alignment Justin Gilmer, Colin Raffel, Samuel S. Schoenholz, Maithra Raghu, and Jascha Sohl-Dickstein 18 Feb 2017ICLR 2017 workshop submissionreaders: everyoneRevisions Abstract: Two recently developed methods, Feedback Alignment (FA) and Direct Feedback Alignment (DFA), have been shown to obtain surprising performance on vision tasks by replacing the traditional backpropagation update with a random feedback update. However, it is still not clear what mechanisms allow learning to happen with these random updates. In this work we argue that DFA can be viewed as a noisy variant of a layer-wise training method we call Linear Aligned Feedback Systems (LAFS). We support this connection theoretically by comparing the update rules for the two methods. We additionally empirically verify that the random update matrices used in DFA work effectively as readout matrices, and that strong correlations exist between the error vectors used in the DFA and LAFS updates. With this new connection between DFA and LAFS we are able to explain why the “alignment” happens in DFA. TL;DR: We interpret DFA as a noisy version of a layer-wise training method we call Linear Aligned Feedback Systems (LAFS). https://openreview.net/forum?id=HkXKUTVFl

GAN

Stability of Generative Adversarial Networks http://www.araya.org/archives/1183

Read-through: Wasserstein GAN http://www.alexirpan.com/2017/02/22/wasserstein-gan.html?utm_content=buffer7f258&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

JS Divergence: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jensen–Shannon_divergence
KL Divergence: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kullback–Leibler_divergence Wasserstein Divergence: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wasserstein_metric

令人拍案叫绝的Wasserstein GAN: https://zhuanlan.zhihu.com/p/25071913

解读GAN及其 2016 年度进展: http://mp.weixin.qq.com/s/zd4NgjoTNmM0N9boPLITJw

Neural Expectation Maximization Klaus Greff, Sjoerd van Steenkiste, Jürgen Schmidhuber 18 Feb 2017 (modified: 21 Feb 2017)ICLR 2017 workshop submissionreaders: everyoneRevisions Abstract: We introduce a novel framework for clustering that combines generalized EM with neural networks and can be implemented as an end-to-end differentiable recurrent neural network. It learns its statistical model directly from the data and can represent complex non-linear dependencies between inputs. We apply our framework to a perceptual grouping task and empirically verify that it yields the intended behavior as a proof of concept. TL;DR: A framework for clustering that combines generalized EM with neural networks and can be implemented as an end-to-end differentiable recurrent neural network Conflicts: usi.ch, idsia.ch, supsi.ch, cai.fi Keywords: Theory, Deep learning, Unsupervised Learning Authorids: klaus@idsia.ch, sjoerd@idsia.ch, juergen@idsia.ch https://openreview.net/forum?id=BJMO1grtl

Preliminary Recommendations on Subcategorisation http://www.ilc.cnr.it/EAGLES96/synlex/node1.html

Reinforcement Learning Sutton’s book: https://webdocs.cs.ualberta.ca/~sutton/book/ebook/the-book.html

UCL Course: http://www0.cs.ucl.ac.uk/staff/D.Silver/web/Teaching.html

Decoding Decoding as Continuous Optimization in Neural Machine Translation https://arxiv.org/abs/1701.02854

VAE

A Hybrid Convolutional Variational Autoencoder for Text Generation: https://arxiv.org/abs/1702.02390

DL: https://openreview.net/forum?id=Sy8gdB9xx Understanding deep learning requires rethinking generalization Chiyuan Zhang, Samy Bengio, Moritz Hardt, Benjamin Recht, Oriol Vinyals 05 Nov 2016 (modified: 25 Feb 2017)ICLR 2017 conference submissionreaders: everyoneRevisions Abstract: Despite their massive size, successful deep artificial neural networks can exhibit a remarkably small difference between training and test performance. Conventional wisdom attributes small generalization error either to properties of the model family, or to the regularization techniques used during training.

Through extensive systematic experiments, we show how these traditional approaches fail to explain why large neural networks generalize well in practice. Specifically, our experiments establish that state-of-the-art convolutional networks for image classification trained with stochastic gradient methods easily fit a random labeling of the training data. This phenomenon is qualitatively unaffected by explicit regularization, and occurs even if we replace the true images by completely unstructured random noise. We corroborate these experimental findings with a theoretical construction showing that simple depth two neural networks already have perfect finite sample expressivity as soon as the number of parameters exceeds the number of data points as it usually does in practice.

We interpret our experimental findings by comparison with traditional models. TL;DR: Through extensive systematic experiments, we show how the traditional approaches fail to explain why large neural networks generalize well in practice, and why understanding deep learning requires rethinking generalization.

Reinforcement Learning with Unsupervised Auxiliary Tasks Max Jaderberg, Volodymyr Mnih, Wojciech Marian Czarnecki, Tom Schaul, Joel Z Leibo, David Silver, Koray Kavukcuoglu 05 Nov 2016 (modified: 04 Mar 2017)ICLR 2017 conference submissionreaders: everyoneRevisions Abstract: Deep reinforcement learning agents have achieved state-of-the-art results by directly maximising cumulative reward. However, environments contain a much wider variety of possible training signals. In this paper, we introduce an agent that also maximises many other pseudo-reward functions simultaneously by reinforcement learning. All of these tasks share a common representation that, like unsupervised learning, continues to develop in the absence of extrinsic rewards. We also introduce a novel mechanism for focusing this representation upon extrinsic rewards, so that learning can rapidly adapt to the most relevant aspects of the actual task. Our agent significantly outperforms the previous state-of-the-art on Atari, averaging 880\% expert human performance, and a challenging suite of first-person, three-dimensional \emph{Labyrinth} tasks leading to a mean speedup in learning of 10$\times$ and averaging 87\% expert human performance on Labyrinth. Conflicts: google.com, ox.ac.uk, ucl.ac.uk Authorids: jaderberg@google.com, vmnih@google.com, lejlot@google.com, schaul@google.com, jzl@google.com, davidsilver@google.com, korayk@google.com https://openreview.net/forum?id=SJ6yPD5xg

On the Origin of Deep Learning https://arxiv.org/abs/1702.07800